Catholic dating an atheist


04-Oct-2017 05:10

Then some bad things happened in my life -- infertility and third trimester pregnancy loss -- and God and I broke up for a while. My job is not to convert him to a believer and his job is to leave my beliefs alone and not mock me for having them (the not mocking part is important). We are both "good, giving, and game." Yes, that term was created by Dan Savage and is meant to tackle sexual turn-ons in relationships (if your partner is into something you're not, you should still try to be good, giving, and game even if you don't want to do that particular act every time), but it also works well with most relationship challenges.

But in my grief I found myself drifting into another liberal Methodist Church, and I found solace there for many years. He grew up without much religious exposure, although his father was a "spiritual seeker," dabbling in everything before returning to the Catholic Church. My husband and his aspirituality cheerfully join me each Christmas Eve at a candlelight service and I drive the car when he wants to photograph freight trains.

Recovery meetings are spiritual (not religious) and at that point I settled on a God-centric but non-Christian spirituality that worked perfectly for me. My husband's spirituality is absolutely not my concern.When couples have struggles over different beliefs, it often results in the Catholic partner leaving his or her faith in favor of the other partner’s. Some people believe as long as a couple is in love and gets along well, it doesn’t matter if their religious beliefs – or lack thereof – differ. When you commit to something or someone in any way, you become to them.Employees are yoked to their company’s owners and their policies, for example, because of their commitment to work for them and represent the owners’ beliefs and philosophies to the public.The response you get to these questions will go a long way to help you discern whether this is the person whom you have been called to forsake all others for. They may not believe in the process, but they don’t have to, because what is important is that you believe in it and they should respect that. I know it sounds like a ridiculous question, but you just never know in this day and age.

If they don’t want to go through the process then I would take that as a red flag and walk away. The Catholic Church defines marriage as a lifelong union between one man and one woman.

When we got sober, my husband tried to find a spirituality that he could accept, but today he's quite happily a staunch agnostic or, as he calls himself, "aspiritual." Throughout our twenty-two year relationship, he's viewed most of my spiritual explorations kindly, supporting me as much as he could. He could care less about church and I could care less about trains, but we're partners so we indulge each other without complaint.



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